International British
Online School

International British Online School

Providing an outstanding, traditional education online from the heart of London

Explore Our Subjects

Explore Our Subjects

Art and Design Curriculum Map

Intent of curriculum

Our intent for the curriculum in Art is to create confident and inquisitive visual learners through a nourishing course based on skills and understanding of the subject. We aim to equip students with the necessary tools to create, experiment and explore ideas with enthusiasm and interest for their world. These ideas and interests can then be used to produce a variety of outcomes in a full range of media.

We aim to develop an understanding of visual language by looking at the work of contemporary artists and makers as well as the way art reflects and shapes the world, we live in.

Our curriculum will allow students to build their ideas and thoughts on the world through sustained investigations and purposeful risk-taking to realise their intentions. We nurture these transferable skills to equip students for life both in and after school.

Implementation of curriculum

We aim to produce a high-quality delivery of the core themes and objectives within Art and Design to enable confident and independent learners to grow with each key stage. We create an ethos of high standards and expectations in the department whilst also ensuring all student’s needs are supported and maintained throughout the courses of study.

As a team, we have developed programs of study for each key stage which build upon each other and expand on the scaffolding of the year before.  Where initially projects are tutor-led, they then allow for individuality to shine while maintaining the skill and understanding required to achieve success.

The department is well equipped with a diverse range of equipment and materials which allow students to have a full and diverse experience in Art, ranging from traditional printmaking to digital photography.

Impact of curriculum

We are confident that students will experience a full, diverse curriculum that allows them to develop ideas, refine work by experiencing materials, record observations and insights and produce personal outcomes. These skills will allow students to build a visual and tactile response to the world around them.

Work at all levels will be monitored with both summative and formative feedback for tasks and challenges set for each project they are working on.

Business Curriculum Map

 

Intent of curriculum

Our intent for the curriculum is to promote and embed the vital role of Business in understanding its importance to how business functions, from small start- up (SME’s) Small Medium Enterprise’s through to (MNC’s) Multi-National Corporations and the vital role that Business plays in keeping the UK and global economy growing through innovations.

Key stage 4 supports students in learning the fundamental basics in Business and the importance of the Economy this will support them in the future so they can make wise business choices as they progress to adulthood, many students have progressed and set up businesses or pursued entrepreneurial opportunities.  The Key Stage 5 curricular embeds the development of employability skills.  The course develops several transferable skills including being analytical, creative thinking, research and problem solving as well as presentation planning, which will help enhance their preparation for future employment.

Our curriculum will both reflect and learn from the diverse cultural mix of our school and community and help to enhance our pupil’s cultural capital through the extensive range of topics and themes it will cover.  Students will learn of many enterprising role models including dyslexic businesspeople.

Implementation of curriculum

We aspire to deliver a modern and relative Business curricular, as Business adapts quicky and new successes and failures appear, we always aspire to keep our curriculum up to date with the current Business world inclusive of the emergence of change in the business delivery during the Covid pandemic.  We try to adapt an environment that allows students to become self-reliant confident and independent learners. We have high targets to aspire to whilst best adapting to suit the range of learners needs, including SEN, to support them in classroom time and in external revision/ support sessions.

There are three broad strands within the Business curriculum that will begin in Key stage 4 and develop towards Level 3 and beyond.

IGCSE covers a wider range of Business topics taught in more depth, with 5 key topics embedding the curricular: Business Activity, Marketing, People, Operations, Finance, Influences on Business and the interdependent nature of Business – this is where students show linked learning and the interdependence of different aspects across the business curricular and how they impact one another.

Impact of curriculum

We are confident that through the content of the curriculum and the way in which Business is developed we can have a positive impact on our students where they complete their students with a real understanding of the Business world for both small- and large-scale Business and the role they may be able to play in the Business world in the near future. We will measure this in several ways:

  • Through regular, reliable, and accessible assessment. There will be termly formal assessments, weekly exam-based questions, and end of year exams. On-going assessment will occur through teacher monitoring of classwork and discussions with pupils. Outcomes of these will be analysed and discussed within the department and interventions and extra support set up where appropriate, afterschool.
  • Transition points will be important for us to match the most suitable learning pathway for our students transition points at Key Stage 3, IGCSE to International A level and International A level to University/World of work – apprenticeships.

 

Computer Science Curriculum Map

For Computer Science, our focus is to extend students’ knowledge and understanding by broadening and deepening skills and using real-world issues and scenarios to comprehend the theory and practice behind this essential subject.

 

Intent of Curriculum

To develop computational thinking skills, providing students with the opportunity to operate confidently in today’s digital world and enabling students to apply computational thinking within context for written and practical examinations. Provide practical opportunities whereby students will be encouraged repeatedly to design, implement and test programs that provide solutions to problems. They will apply their skills to produce robust programs, which will help them progress to further/higher education where practical knowledge and experience will be required. Students will develop the ability to:

  • apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical problem-solving experience. This will include designing, writing and debugging programs
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • apply mathematical skills relevant to computer science
  • Use rationale during theory and practical lessons, allowing them to understand why such learning is taking place and where this stands in terms of their holistic learning
  • Have every opportunity of implementing cross-curricular learning, namely being able to use: written; persuasive; debating; presenting and overall communicative skills
  • Fill gaps in knowledge by confidently accessing the curriculum, completing resources and developing an understanding of new information gained
  • Use all lessons and topics as knowledge hubs – to then be competent sitting all assessments
  • Use relevant programs for coding numbers; creating slides and presentations; formulating spreadsheets and graphs; writing reports, letters and emails
  • Access revision lessons to help refresh learning of the curriculum and allow them to become ambassadors of Computer Science – teaching and passing on crucial knowledge to others

 

Implementation of Curriculum

Across the Key Stages, students will be exploring the following topics:

  • Problem-solving - students are expected to develop computational thinking skills to understand how computer systems work. They will design, implement and analyse algorithms for solving problems. Students will have repeated opportunities to tackle computational problems, including some substantial problem-solving tasks in Key Stages 3 and 4.
  • Programming – students will be learning to design, read, write and debug programs and given plenty of opportunities to develop and practise their programming skills. In Key Stages 2 and 3, they will develop their knowledge and skills using a low-level programming language, and for Key Stage 4, they will use a high-level programming language.
  •   Data – students will understand that computers can store and manipulate large quantities of data and use binary to represent different types of data. They will understand how different data types are represented in a computer and relate this to their experiences.
  •  Computers - Students will become familiar with the hardware and software components of a computer system. In Key Stages 3 and 4, they will come to recognise that computers take many forms, from embedded microprocessors to distributed clouds and be able to explain each structure.
  •  Communication and the internet - Students should understand the fundamental principles behind the organisation of computer networks. They will be able to experiment by setting up a simple network in key Stage 2 and more complex networks in Key Stages 3 and 4. They will explore what makes us vulnerable to attacks from cybercriminals and, by Key Stage 4, aim to provide more advanced evaluation and suggestions to counteract such attacks.
  •  The bigger picture - Students will understand the influence of computing technology and recognise that computing impacts nearly every aspect of the world in which they live. In Key Stage 2, they will develop an understanding of their consequences whilst online and in Key Stages 3 and 4, providing reasoning behind their actions and how they play a part in the broader context.

By the end of Key Stage 4, students will be in place to sit the two International GCSE papers:

 

Paper 1: Principles of Computer Science - this paper will primarily assess knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of computer science, including some coverage of how these principles are applied when solving problems that relate to a particular situation.

 

Paper 2: Application of Computational Thinking - this paper will primarily assess the practical application of computational thinking, whereby learners will create, use and adapt existing algorithms to solve problems in a particular situation. This paper will also test students’ knowledge and understanding of the topics.

Assessment is through a 3-hour practical examination. A choice of three programming languages will be available (Python, C# or Java).

 

Impact of Curriculum

Problem-solving by using computational thinking to develop code, showing perseverance through using tools and techniques to remove errors in code, communicating ideas to peers, and discussing the logic of coding exemplify the critical development of students’ cognitive, interpersonal and intrapersonal skills. Allowing creativity, intellectual openness and giving plenty of opportunity for positive core self-evaluation and incorporating cross-curricular learning are the essential transferrable skills that will be acquired through the study of Computer Science.

Curriculum overview

Intent of curriculum 

English is, and will always be an integral part of any student’s journey toward scholastic excellence. Owing to the nature of our vast, multicultural online community, the need of the individuals to access their learning, predominantly stems from their ability to access language – in this case English. The study of English, whilst integral from an educational perspective, also needs to be viewed from the other angle of the students being able to access their learning. As an English department we hope to nurture not just a passion for learning but also for language. The skills we nurture are intricately linked to the students own personal needs, and include, but are not limited to speaking, literacy, comprehension, and creativity. We study a wide range of texts throughout the key stages, and we approach them in a way that suits our student body. Whilst curriculum demands that certain authors are studied, to mitigate the over prevalence of one cultural perspective, we tailor our lessons and content in a way that speaks to our students and enables them to connect themselves to what is being taught. We don’t just aim to nurture the skills but the mind too, facilitating our students best possible outcomes for learning and life.

Implementation of curriculum 

Key stage 1 and 2 English provides the essential building blocks of phonics and language skills for each student, language development and communication skills are a key priority. Students are motivated to use and apply new vocabulary and grammar structures by exploring them through interactive games, learning to become fluent speakers and having numerous opportunities to practise their letter formation, phonics and writing skills. Whilst in the Foundation Stage, children are immersed daily in a wide range of quality stories, rhymes, songs and non-fiction texts, to develop their love of books and reading. 

Key stage 3 English provides the foundations for study at higher levels. The students are introduced to the skills required to analyse and understand what is being presented to them. Through speech writing and class performance to debates, that require the rewriting of complex pieces of texts from alternative perspectives. The challenges are endless and enable the students to dig beneath the surface of what is being taught and embrace a deeper learning. We believe that depth as opposed to breath of learning is key to our students realising their full potential. A tailored approach allows us to narrow the field of what students are exposed to and need to learn (this is essential with our multilinguistic student body) whilst simultaneously allowing the students time and space to unlock their own learning. Due to the extraordinarily diverse student population, flexibility is key in our delivery as students come to us with different understanding and levels of learning. The department prides itself on its ability to differentiate not just for ability but also for language. We pride ourselves on breaking down the barriers that learning in a second, third and sometimes even fourth language can present. During year 9 essential skills are introduced to prepare students for year 10 and 11. The start of year 9 sees an in depth look at plays this is tackled through exploration of Shakespeare and 20 century texts. This enables the students to start unpicking the difficulties with this literary works and honing their skills for the preparation for their iGCSE. Towards the end of year 9 students start to study specific iGCSE texts to facilitate a more seamless transition into their two-year key stage 4 exam years.

Key stage 4 builds on the foundations of skill and analysis in key stage 3, working toward the English Language and Literature iGCSE examinations in year 11. Key stage 4 is balanced between reading, writing and listening, covering a wide range of genres and forms across the two years. Students will encounter a variety of text types and explore ways to communicate in several forms and styles, learning the required conventions of each one. We explore different perspectives and consider how these perspectives are presented to a reader in line with political or personal bias – through learning how to understand these methods they will have more ability to spot their use in the real world.  Effective recall strategies will be employed to improve students’ ability to retain quotations and contextual information at Key Stage 4 in preparation for Literature examinations. Lessons will be a mixture of teacher led, group work and independent work. The department is well resourced and there are a wide range of teaching strategies employed to ensure students are ready for the iGCSE examinations at the end of year 11.

Key stage 5 English follows the International Advanced Level in English Language curriculum. Key stage 5 students are now faced with taking their knowledge and understanding of the English language to a much more complex level of analysis. The focus of the curriculum is largely understanding personal identity, space and place through language formation. Students engage with a wide range of topics and themes to unpack challenging questions of how the English language has formed and become a globally dominant language. We explore different perspectives and identities through different modes of communication, learning complex terminology and deep analysis skills. Students will cover four different modules, focusing on comparative analysis skills, essay writing and research. All of the foundations throughout their educational pathway in key stages 1 to 4 have prepared students for this next step into higher level Language analysis.

Impact of curriculum

We are confident that through the content of the curriculum and the way in which it is delivered that English will have a meaningful impact on pupil’s ability to communicate critically and confidently in their time at school and beyond. We deliver our English Language and Literature curricula through engaging, developing and constantly improving methods of teaching and by ensuring that each classroom is a safe space for every student to be able to share their ideas and opinions without fear of judgement or bias. We teach in a thorough and varied manner with the confidence to try out new approaches to best suit the needs of our students. We set high standards and aspirational targets whilst ensuring that the needs of learners of all abilities and from all backgrounds, including those with special educational needs, are supported inside and outside of the classroom.     

All students are regularly assessed formally and in class. The assessments are not only checking for progress but are also an excellent way of awakening those early skills that will be required at the higher levels of learning. Whilst there are always key elements that will always be included working toward the examinations, there is still space for the evolution of the topics alongside the curriculum to facilitate the best possible learning environment. The cross curricular approach to the study of English also allows for the incorporation of social context, history, geography, and religion, allowing the students to connect their learning across multiple subjects. This is integral to our approach to the curriculum and how it should be utilised to both educate and broaden the minds of our students.

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

KS3

Year 7

Fantasy writing

Literary exploration

Biographies

Poetry

Myths and legends

Introduction to Shakespeare

Year 8

Literary exploration

Introduction to Dickens

Gothic Fiction

Mystery stories

The Hobbit

Poetry

Year 9

Introduction to plays

Monologues, poetry and speaking

Detective fiction

Travel writing

War Poetry

iGCSE preparation: Of Mice and Men

KS4

Year 10

Of Mice and Men

An Inspector Calls

An Inspector Calls

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet

Spoken language endorsement 

Year 11

Unseen Poetry

Poetry Anthology

Transactional writing and comprehension

IGCSE exam revision

EXAMINATIONS

EXAMINATIONS

Geography holds the key to our future. It is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena of the Earth and how they interact with one another.

As an up-to-date, highly relevant subject, it’s one of the most exciting, adventurous and valuable areas of study today. So many of the world's current problems have answers in Geography and need the geographers of the future to help us understand them. Global warming, sustainable food production, more frequent natural disasters, the spread of disease, migration and the future of energy resources are just some of the great challenges facing the next generation of geographers.

Geography captures the imagination of our students and helps them to contextualise and understand the issues they see locally, regionally and globally.

The KS1-KS2 curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
  • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
  • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
  • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.

KS3

The overall aim of KS3 Geography is to enable students to understand and interpret their world whilst laying a solid foundation for the upcoming themes at GCSE. Students become effective and independent learners, and critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds. We also strive to develop student awareness of the usefulness of geographical analysis, to understand and solve contemporary human and environmental problems.

iGCSE

This qualification enables students to explore the world, the challenges it faces and their own place in it, and to help prepare them to succeed in their chosen pathway. The content and assessment approach for this qualification has been designed to meet students’ needs in the following ways.

Two-paper assessment – a new, two-paper model allows students to focus on physical and human geography. The qualification will test knowledge and understanding, as well as analytical, evaluation and fieldwork skills in both papers. Concepts and content – the content in both

Paper 1: Physical geography and Paper 2: Human geography is engaging and accessible for all students. The material is appropriate and relevant for progression, building understanding and awareness of a range of geographical concepts and skills, including fieldwork.

 Localised content: teachers can localise the fieldwork and content covered to suit the needs and interests of a range of international learners in different regions. Clear and straightforward question papers – our question papers are clear and accessible for students of all ability ranges. A range of question styles will be used. Our mark schemes are straightforward so that the assessment requirements are clear. Broad and deep development of skills – the design of the revised International GCSE aims to extend students’ knowledge by broadening and deepening skills.

 For example, students will:

  • develop and apply a holistic range of knowledge and understanding of geographical concepts and skills, including fieldwork.
  • present and analyse data, draw conclusions and evaluate information from different sources.
  • develop awareness of global issues and challenges and that, in moving towards a sustainable future, people have different views and attitudes to the environment.

 Progression to A Level – International GCSEs enable successful progression to Level 3 qualifications (such as the International A Level in Geography) and beyond, in geography and other subjects. Through our world-class qualification development process, we have consulted international geography teaching experts to validate this qualification and endorse its content, skills development and assessment structure.

Global Citizenship Curriculum Map

 

Intent of curriculum 

The Global Citizenship curriculum supports our students to be happy, both mentally and physically. It does this by helping them to be resilient, proactive and independent, and by giving them the knowledge they need to develop their moral compass to empower them to make the correct choices in their personal and academic lives. Our curriculum supports students to achieve their potential by promoting their wellbeing and tackling issues that can affect their ability to learn. Our Global Citizenship curriculum champions diversity, respect and empathy for others. It celebrates difference and challenges discrimination. All young people can see themselves reflected in the inclusive curriculum. Students will have the opportunity to work with their peers, to articulate their opinions and debate differing points of view. 

There are three key themes running throughout the Global Citizenship curriculum: Health and Wellbeing; Relationships and Relationship Education; and Living in the Wider World. The health and wellbeing strand helps students to be emotionally and physically healthy so they can thrive in and out of school, tackling issues that can prevent them from achieving their potential. Through relationship education, students learn how to make safe choices and where to go for support. They develop their knowledge of what constitutes disrespectful and unacceptable behaviour and learn about all types of stable, respectful and loving relationships and how they are created and nurtured, so this is something they aspire for themselves. By focusing on living in the wider world, students develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to thrive as individuals, in the workplace and as members of society. They learn how to manage the most critical opportunities, challenges and responsibilities they will face as they grow up. 

Implementation of curriculum 

We deliver a relevant, preventative and proactive curriculum that pre-empts possible future issues. The statutory content and guidance on relationships and sex education, as well as health education is delivered. The Citizenship National curriculum is delivered at both Key Stage3 and Key Stage4, and careers education to all years. A spiral learning model has been adopted, so students revisit themes several times throughout their time at school, with the complexity of the content increasing each time and links made between prior and new learning.  This enables knowledge to be embedded and allows for an in-depth development of important topics for the long-term benefit of our students. Key terminology will be discussed in lessons to broaden students’ vocabulary. 

There will be a breadth of learning opportunities and the needs of all our students will be catered for.  Lessons will be a mixture of teacher led activities, independent work, group work and debates, with outside speakers on occasions sharing their expertise. The curriculum will be delivered in a climate that clarifies boundaries, maintains respect and enables students to discuss information and issues, including sensitive topics, safely and effectively. Challenging topics will be taught with sensitivity, with teachers using their pastoral knowledge of their tutor group to notice potential issues. 

Impact of curriculum  

Ultimately, our Global Citizenship curriculum ensures students develop the knowledge and attributes they need to achieve their academic potential and to manage their lives, now and in the future, so they leave school equipped with the skills they need for later life. Its impact will be measured through: 

  • Assessment opportunities: Baseline assessments at the start of topics; formative assessment opportunities including student self-reflection; summative assessments to establish factual knowledge. These will inform the learning process and identify further learning needs 
  • Feedback from students and teachers to evaluate the relevance and effectiveness of the curriculum 

 

Intent of Curriculum

History is an interesting and rewarding subject that will prepare students well for the future.

Key historical skills include:

Chronological Thinking
Historical Comprehension
Historical Analysis and Interpretation
Historical Research Skills
Historical Issues:  Analysis and Decision-Making

Key skills you will gain from studying history:

explaining

analysing

forming arguments,

debating

research

critical thinking

We study a global history looking at global events and how they impacted the past, the present and how they will the future.

Implementation of Curriculum

The KS1 curriculum introduces what history is and key concepts within the subject. It covers local to global. This is because we anticipate students to have a low level of knowledge of global history. This allows students to study a far-reaching, diverse, challenging and engaging set of topics. Students are given extra support in the first few lessons, which introduce them to history as a subject and to the key historical skills. Lessons incorporate primary developmental skills through lessons like practical demonstrations. Special lessons are also inserted throughout the school year, to continue to develop key historical skills and to inspire a love of the subject and learning.

The KS2 History is based on a global history from Mayans to the Romans. It covers local to global. This is because we anticipate students to have a low level of knowledge of global history. This allows students to study a far-reaching, diverse, challenging and engaging set of topics. Students are given extra support in the first few lessons, which introduce them to history as a subject and to the key historical skills. Special lessons are also inserted throughout the school year, to continue to develop key historical skills and to inspire a love of the subject and learning.

The KS3 history course takes students on a chronological tour, starting with Ancient Greece and finishing with the Cold War. This allows students to study a far-reaching, diverse, challenging and engaging set of topics. Students are given extra support in the first few lessons, which introduce them to history as a subject and to the key historical skills. Special lessons are also inserted throughout the school year, to continue to develop key historical skills and to inspire a love of the subject and learning.

The KS4 course is based on the iGCSE scheme of work. Four different modules have been chosen and they provide a diverse, challenging and engaging set of modules. Students will be familiar with some topics from the KS3 course. Lessons are focused to develop the key historical skills they will have learnt at KS3 level, so that students develop the necessary skills required at iGCSE level. There are also special lessons throughout the year to help develop key historical skills in an engaging way so that not only do students develop their key historical skills, they also develop a love of the subject and learning.

The KS5 course is based on the iAL scheme of work. Four modules have been chosen. Some of these link topic-wise to the previous KS3 and KS4 topics, to provide students with some familiarity but with the right amount of challenge. Lessons are focused to continue to develop their historical skills, and boost their historical knowledge, so that students succeed at this level. The course will also develop them with the right skills needed to succeed at university level should students go onto degree level. There are also special lessons throughout the year to help develop key historical skills in an engaging way so that not only do students develop their key historical skills, they also develop a love of the subject and learning.

Impact of Curriculum

KS1: Homework set is aimed at further developing key historical skills and to provide opportunities for research as well as practice assessment questions to further bolster students essay writing skills. There are opportunities for reflection and for recall of key knowledge. Students are assessed through their development of basic historical, literacy and numeracy skills.

KS2: Homework set is aimed at further developing key historical skills and to provide opportunities for research as well as practice assessment questions to further bolster students essay writing skills. There are opportunities for reflection and for recall of key knowledge. Students are assessed through their development of basic historical, literacy and numeracy skills to build on KS1.

KS3: Homework set is aimed at further developing key historical skills and to provide opportunities for research as well as practice assessment questions to further bolster students essay writing skills. There are opportunities for reflection and for recall of key knowledge. The end of year 8 and then year 9 has topics that students will go on to study at iGCSE level, preparing them for the KS4 curriculum. Students are assessed on their key historical skills, knowledge and the use of questions that will prepare them for iGCSE level.

KS4: Homework set allows students to practice their historical research skills and exam-style questions. There are opportunities for reflection and for recall of key knowledge. Students are assessed on their key historical skills, knowledge and the use of questions for iGCSE level.

KS5: Homework set involves plenty of exam-style questions for exam practice, and also opportunities to continue to develop their historical research skills. There are opportunities for reflection and for recall of key knowledge. Students are assessed on their key historical skills, knowledge and the use of questions for iA level.

Intent 

At iBOS we teach mathematics because the routine and habit of thinking mathematically is life-enriching. Our teachers recognise the importance of being numerate to take part in society as well as the dependency of strong mathematicians on the economy and other related subjects including science and geography. Our curriculum intends to enrich our students with a meaningful mathematics education where they are encouraged to think logically, work systematically and ultimately to be challenged.

Implementation

KS2:

For Mathematics our implementation is developed through the secure understanding of the curriculum and subject area.

  • Foundational skills are taught and revised weekly.
  • There is a deep emphasis on Mathematics focussed terminology.
  • Initially, there is a focus on key mathematical concepts including place value, the four operations and fractions.
  • Reasoning practice is used to challenge all children and give them the opportunity to reason with their fluent understanding.
  • Children are taught in small mixed ability whole class lessons with 4 hours per week.
  • Homework is set to develop and review children's learning hence is provided once a week to each year group in KS2 as per the iBOS homework policy.
  • Assessment Points measure progress and attainment every half term. This guides and informs lesson planning as well as intervention measures where necessary.
  • Where possible, cross curricular links are made with other subjects including in Science, Geography and ICT.

KS3:

Our curriculum planning is constantly being shaped and molded to fit the needs of our students. Schemes of work are recognised as documents in progress with a key focus on embedding challenge, metacognition, recitation and memory techniques. KS3 teachers of mathematics use a variety of teaching approaches and online learning tools which includes the use of online whiteboard software, deliberate practice via Quizizz and polls via Adobe Connect. Teachers at iBOS also aim to encourage students to develop and demonstrate mathematical behavior and as such our curriculum encourages students to develop deeper understanding to make links across other curriculum areas.

KS4:

At Key Stage 4 our students follow the iGCSE specification as described by Edexcel, whilst following the specification points teachers utilize opportunities to link topics to wider learning and contextual abstract concepts to deepen understanding for all students. As students approach their final year at Key stage 4 they will follow a personalized scheme of learning that targets gaps in knowledge as identified by the thorough question level analysis (QLA) of each student’s performance in the frequent assessments that take place. This fully prepares them for success in their iGCSE examination.

KS5:

At Key Stage 5 our students follow the international A Level specification as described by Edexcel, whilst following the specification points teachers utilize opportunities to develop understanding of mathematical processes in a way that promotes critical thinking, confidence, fosters enjoyment and cultivates life-ready, rational decision-makers. We instill precise mathematical language necessary to construct conjectures or inferences through a coherent line of reasoning and with a pervasive recognition that different areas of mathematics are connected. We utilize mathematical modeling to blur the distinction between abstract and practical modes of thought.

Impact

iBOS teachers are confident that our intended impact of the curriculum and its delivery will produce learners that become fluent in the foundational concepts and ideas of Mathematics.

Learners will reason and solve problems by applying their mathematical understanding to a variety of situations. All learners are encouraged to achieve and go beyond their age related expectations.

Students at iBOS have a love and passion for mathematics and this is expected to continue with our future cohorts.

 Autumn 1Autumn 2Spring 1Spring 2Summer 1Summer 2
Year 3/4Number: place valueNumber: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division

Number: fractions.

Geometry:position and direction.

Decimals

Number: Percentages

Number: Algebra

Measurement: Perimeter, area and volume

Number: ratio

Statistics

Geometry properties of shape

Consolidation and SATs preparation

Year 5/6Number: place valueNumber: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division

Number: fractions.

Geometry:position and direction.

Decimals

Number: Percentages

Number: Algebra

Measurement: Perimeter, area and volume

Number: ratio

Statistics

Geometry properties of shape

Consolidation and SATs preparation

Year 7

Algebra,

Factors and multiples,

Sequences, Area and perimeter of shapes

Algebra: solving equations,

FDP

Number: negative numbers, Averages,Fractions

Percentage change,

Scatter graphs

Linear graphs,

Congruent shapes

Year 8

Higher order of operations,

Transformations

Powers and roots,

Introduction to standard form

Percentages,

Linear equations,

Equation of a straight line

Scatter graphs

Congruency,

Enlargements

Pythagoras Theorem,

Working with large numbers

Ratio and proportion,

Expanding double brackets

Year 9Algebra, Conversion of metric units, volume of prisms and cuboidsVolume of cylinders and spheres, speed, distance and time,Linear graphs and table of values, Pythagoras’ theorem,Algebra (quadratics), density, mass and volume, unit pricing,Powers and Roots, Rounding, standard form, sequencesYear 10 syllabus begins.
Year 10

Rounding and estimation

Special numbers and powers

Special numbers: Surds

Index laws

Fractional thinking

Percentages

Ratio and proportion

Calculating with standard form

Straight line graphs

Probability

Solving quadratics

Pythagoras and trigonometry

Perimeter, Area and Volume

Direct and inverse proportion

Averages and range

Similar shapes

Year 11

Transformations,

Vectors

Analyzing data, charts and graphs,

Congruency

Inequalities, proof & simultaneous equations

Algebraic graphs,

Probability

Revision and exam

paper practise.

 
Year 12

Algebraic manipulation

Simultaneous equations

Straight Line graphs

Representations of data

Circles,

Binomial Expansion

Trigonometry

Exponentials

Measures of location and spread, Probability

Logarithms

Differentiation

Integration

Probability continued

Correlation and regression

Sequences and series

Radians

Proof by contradiction

Discrete random variables

Modeling in

mechanics

Kinematics graphs

Kinematic equations

Normal distribution tables

Algebraic fractions

Partial fractions

Functions

Variable acceleration

and calculus

Forces

Exam practice

Year 13

Trigonometry

Parametric equations

Binomial expansion

Exponentials and

logarithms

Differentiation

Differentiation Integration Differential equations Numerical methods Vectors

Correlation and

Regression

Probability

Normal distributions

Kinematics in 2

dimensions

Dynamics

Moments

Revision and exam

paper practise.

Revision and exam

paper practise.

 

Curriculum Overview through Key Stages 2-3-4

INTENT:

Our mission at the International British Online School (iBOS) is to make sure that all our students achieve the best possible outcomes. Learning a foreign language (French and Spanish) is, in some way, like assimilating a culture since language the societies that speak them. Foreign languages play an important role to understanding societies generally and their various facets as well as eroding boundaries and lessening differences among people or bringing mutual understanding – all key aspects for a global learning community such as iBOS.

Language learning is very demanding and requires resilience and perseverance; students are explicitly taught the need for continual practice to develop their skills as linguists. Although teachers and students will strive for accuracy, mistakes are an integral part of learning a language and students are encouraged to learn from their own mistakes and the mistakes of others, which must be done in a mutually respectful way.

The MFL Department aims to provide students with the cognitive and practical skills needed to become effective linguists at any stage of their lives as well as relatively fluent in the language or languages they are studying.

Therefore, our goal is to teach our students how to communicate effectively and confidently in a foreign language in real-life contexts, whilst inspiring them to extend and pursue language learning outside the classroom in order to enhance their further study and any possible future career.

IMPLEMENTATION: 

Key stage 2 deals with curriculum content which aims to establish the basics in language acquisition. Pupils are exposed to interactive authentic sources in both French and Spanish, and respond in lessons in the target language, both orally and in writing. Pupils learn grammatical structures as well, such as verbs in the present tense, to be able to talk about themselves and their interests.

Key Stage 3 builds on the foundations of foreign language learning that have been taught at Key Stage 2. Students can relate easily to discussing about themselves, their family, school, leisure pursuits, holidays, technology, and town. These topics provide opportunities for free expression and creativity together with activities that motivate and stimulate learners in an engaging and fun way. There is also opportunity to begin to examine the differences in the languages, both culturally and linguistically. Furthermore, these topics are studied in more detail at GCSE.

At Key Stage 4 the Department follows the IGCSE Edexcel course books, which are centred around the consolidation of the vocabulary and topics acquired in Key Stage 3 in a more advanced way with a greater emphasis on authentic language through different materials and sources. The topics indeed run thematically and become more challenging throughout the course. The students will sit the IGCSE Edexcel examination, which comprises three papers: a listening paper (25% of the total IGCSE), a reading and writing paper (50% of the total IGCSE) and a speaking test (25% of the total IGCSE). These four basic skills are therefore developed in lessons using a range of authentic materials: written articles, film extracts, short video clips and a range of audio materials. The purpose is for students to take an active part in everyday situations, talking about personal interests, sharing opinions and experiences, as well as writing short essays. Lessons are varied, interactive, and aim to develop a wide range of positive language-learning habits, tailored according to students’ strengths and abilities.

 

IMPACT:

  • Key Stage 2

Teaching focuses on enabling pupils to make substantial progress in a foreign language, and provides an appropriate balance of spoken and written language. At the end of Year 6, students achieve the foundations for further foreign language teaching at key stage 3. It should enable pupils to understand and communicate ideas, facts and feelings in speech and writing, focused on familiar and routine matters, using their knowledge of phonology, grammatical structures, and vocabulary. The focus of study in modern languages will be on practical communication.

  • Key Stage 3

Students are encouraged to regularly learn key vocabulary and are given vocabulary tests every two weeks. To do so, different online tools and platforms are used by the students and the teacher to check students’ progress, such as Quizlet, Memrise, Duolingo Class, and Quizizz.

By the end of year 7, students will be able to use the present tense with regular and key irregular verbs. Pupils need to know a range of basics well including numbers, days, months, time, opinions and reasons and can confidently talk about themselves in detail.

By the end of year 8 students will have a good knowledge of how to form the near future and basic perfect tense. They will be able to discuss holidays and how to describe a future and past trip. Pupils will also be able to discuss technology and how they pass their time with their friends. They begin to be able to speak French and Spanish in more authentic settings e.g. directions, ordering in a shop and tourist information.

By the end of year 9, students begin to understand some of the key skills examined at GCSE level including the role play, picture cards, translation and writing tasks. Pupils build on their basic knowledge of the tenses and can use 3 tenses more confidentially. They can apply their knowledge to family, leisure pursuits, festivals, and town.

  • Key Stage 4

KS4 students are encouraged to memorize sets of new words in order to sit a vocabulary tests on a weekly basis.

By the end of year 10, pupils have completed their first full GCSE mock papers. They understand fully the full range of exams they will sit and they have begun to develop strategies to complete these tasks with confidence.

By the end of year 11, pupils will have completed the course and be fully prepared to sit their IGCSEs. They will have embedded key vocab, grammar, and skills to complete the four skills successfully.

 

 

French

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 3-4

Myself, family and pets

Numeracy

Where I live and my interests

 

 

 

Year 5-6

Introduce yourself

What I like, leisure and food

Family and friends,

My school

 

 

 

Year 7

About myself

My school

My hobbies

My neighbourhood

Holidays

Enrichment

Year 8

Free-time activities

My past holidays

My identity

Relationships

My house,

Food and festivals

Talent and ambitions

Enrichment

Year 9

My teenage life

Health and lifestyle

Childhood

Future plans and jobs

Social issues

Enrichment

Year 10

Personal life and relationships

Social activities and technology

Food, customs and festivals

Home and abroad

Travels and holidays

Education

Year 11

Employment

Fitness and health

Global issues and solutions

Exam preparation

Exam preparation

 

 

Spanish

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 3-4

 

 

 

Myself, family and pets

Numeracy

Where I live and my interests

Year 5-6

 

 

 

Introduce myself

What I like, leisure and food

Family and friends,

My school

Year 7

My life

My free time

My school

My family and friends

My town

Enrichment

Year 8

My past holidays

Social activities

Food and customs

Future plans and sport

Travelling and holidays

Enrichment

Year 9

My identity

And my pastimes

School and personal life

My neighbourhood

My holidays and leisure

Festivals and traditions

Future plans

Year 10

Home and abroad

Education and employment

Personal life and relationships

The world around us

Social activities

Health and fitness

Year 11

My neighbourhood

Customs and festivals

Future plans

Exam preparation

Exam preparation

 

 

Religious Studies

Science

 

Intent of curriculum 

Science’s intent for the curriculum is to continually develop a student’s substantive and disciplinary knowledge in a spiral manner over 5-7 years. They will learn to appreciate the vitally important role that science plays in developing our global society. During this curriculum journey for science, they will: 

  1. Develop their abilities to work together and feel valued within a positive learning environment.     
  2. Nurture their confidence to know and recall their substantive knowledge in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.
  3. Reflect on the social, moral, cultural and spiritual impact science has on the world and expand their cultural capital experiences within science.
  4. Encourage the development of their disciplinary knowledge such as methods, apparatus and techniques, data analysis and communications and using evidence for explanations (working scientifically).
  5. Be inspired to make qualified choices within their chosen educational pathways and their future post-education careers which are becoming increasingly scientific and technologically based.                                                  

  

Implementation of curriculum 

We have a dynamic and relevant science curriculum developed by all departmental members which identifies opportunities for pupils to develop their self-reliance, confidence, enquiring and independent mindsets. We have high standards which are evidenced within the curriculum and the department sets aspirational targets whilst ensuring that the needs of learners, including SEND, are supported (planned within and beyond the classroom).  

There are ten key themes within KS3 science, and these diversify and develop further at IGCSE and beyond. 

Throughout a student’s time in science, they will experience an equal balance of Biology, Chemistry and Physics content at Key Stages 3 and 4. Lessons will cover the substantive and disciplinary knowledge in science such as core principles, mathematical skills, required practicals and all working scientifically concepts. Furthermore, the interleaving and common ideas within each science specialism, across science specialisms and cross-curricula will also be emphasised and explored.  

Teachers within the department have worked collaboratively on a curriculum map that meets the KS3 and KS4 curricula needs. This has informed the design of the Science department’s schemes of work to ensure substantive and disciplinary knowledge are clearly taught and linked together to ensure a coherent flow for students through the science curriculum. The design also encourages the support of long-term retainment of this substantive and disciplinary knowledge, ensuring students are ready to apply them in their future lives and careers. 

 Impact of curriculum  

The impact of the curriculum will be measured in several ways.  

  1. In class teacher-led reviews and formative feedback – this low-risk challenge and review environment for pupils will include: 
  • recap recall quick starters, homework and quizzes
  • review tasks, multichoice and extended questions
  • in class exam-style questions
  1. Through rigorous, reliable and accessible assessment.  
  • Formal assessments at the end of every unit of work across all 3 science subjects,  
  • End of term and year exams.  

Assessments will be departmentally moderated and outcomes will be analysed and discussed within the department and interventions and extra support set up where appropriate. Specific groups such as SEN & Disadvantaged will be closely monitored.  

  1. Lessons observations and work scrutinises
  2. Pupil and teacher voice
  3. Departmental data tracking  
  • Constant reviewing of a student’s progress within an academic year, across their academic years and at key transition points – KS3 to IGCSE, GCSE to international A level and International A level to university/work/training.  

We are confident that through the delivery of substantive and disciplinary knowledge in the curriculum and how it is delivered, pupils will appreciate the importance of science within the world and the relevance it has to their lives within a global environment.